Shockwave Therapy

There is a new form of treatment available at Kardinia Osteopathic Clinic!

Dolorclast Radial Shockwave Therapy is useful for the treatment of pain related to a number of chronic soft tissue conditions including:

•  Plantar Fasciitis

•  Achilles tendinopathy

•  Bursitis

•  Tennis/golfer's elbow

•  Rotator cuff tendonitis

•  Hamstring tendonitis

•  Patellar tendinopathy

•  Shin splints

•  ITB syndrome

•  Chronic trigger points

What is shockwave therapy?

Shockwave therapy involves using an applicator against your skin, which generates high-pressured soundwaves to break down targeted tissue and stimulate tissue repair.

There are two main actions of shockwave therapy:

1. Increasing blood flow to the area to enhance healing

2. Depletion of neurotransmitter substance P which is responsible for pain

The high energy soundwaves have been proven to stimulate white blood cell production which promotes healing, stimulates collagen production to aid in tendon repair and breaks down soft tissue calcification. It has also been proven to reduce a neurotransmitter involved in sending messages of pain to the brain (substance P), which is a major cause of chronic pain. In summary, shockwave therapy causes an increase in tissue repair and brings about pain relief which enables the affected area to recover much faster.

What does treatment involve?

Shockwaves are applied via an applicator held against the skin. The initial phase of treatment may cause some deep pain which indicates correct targeting of the problem area and stimulation of the required inflammatory process. As the treatment continues, there will often be a feeling of numbness which reduces the degree of discomfort. This process usually takes 10-15 minutes depending on the condition being treated. Many patients experience pain relief after the first treatment, however, research shows that 3-6 treatments are required for optimal results, with the average being 3-4 treatments.

You may experience some soreness which may intensify on the night of treatment. Simple analgesia and the application of ice to the area may be required to ease this pain. There may also be some minor bruising in the treated area. You should rest from aggravating activities for 2-3 days after treatment as your practitioner will discuss.

Side effects:

• Post-treatment soreness as mentioned above

• Local bruising – uncommon and minor

• Tendon rupture has not been reported following radial shockwave therapy, unlike cortisone injection and surgery

Contraindications:

Please inform your doctor if you have any of the following contraindications, as this form of treatment may not be appropriate for you:

• Pregnancy

• Bleeding, blood coagulation disorders or associated medication consumption

• Skin wound or acute inflammation in treatment area

• Tumour in treatment area

 

Costs:

This is an additional cost to our regular consultation fee if you receive treatment as well. Sometimes you may only get shockwave, in that case the fee is just for the shockwave compnent. 

1 body part $30

2 body parts $50

3 body parts $70

 

If you have any questions please feel free to discuss these with your practitioner.

Results:

Our clinic strives to keep up to date with the latest quality scientific research. We have provided some useful resources below which outline supporting evidence for the use of shockwave therapy.

 

Foot Pain

Gerdesmeyer L, Frey C, Vester J, et al.

Radial extracorporeal shock wave therapy is safe and effective in the treatment of chronic recalcitrant plantar fasciitis: results of a confirmatory randomized placebo-controlled multicenter study. Am J Sports Med 2008;36:2100-2109 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18832341

IRompe JD, Furia JP, Maffulli N

Eccentric loading, compared with shock wave treatment for chronic insertional Achilles tendinopathy: A randomized controlled trial. J Bone Joint Surg Am 2008;90:52-61

http://jbjs.org/article.aspx?articleid=28433

Shoulder

Engebretsen K, Grotle M, Bautz-Holter E, et al.

Radial extracorporeal shockwave treatment compared with supervised exercises in patients with subacromial pain syndrome: a single blind randomised study. Brit Med J 2009; 339:b3360

http://www.bmj.com/content/339/bmj.b3360

 

Tennis Elbow

Spacca G, Necozione S, Cacchio A.

Radial shockwave therapy for lateral epicondylitis. A prospective randomised controlled single-blind study. Eura Medicorphys 2005; 41:17-25

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16175767